Isolation Feet for Laptop


It seems fairly common knowledge that vibration is a form of distortion in many electric components, not just for turntables and speakers. Isolation feet seem to work well in most applications.

I searched around and I didn't find any information to suggest that folks are using isolation feet on laptops or desktops, despite increased streaming usage. In a great many cases, there are indeed heavy vibrations coming from within the computer.  Whether it is the fan for the CPU or even GPU to the all the various chips/transformers, etc or even power supplies and batteries. If adding isolation feet to a streamer, DAC or power supply makes sense, then wouldn't it also make sense to apply isolation feet to your laptop; if you use it for music?

Well, I am going to find out. :)

I ordered some IsoAcoustics Orea Series Audio Equipment Isolators with a max weight of 16 pounds. The laptop weighs about 6.7 pounds, so it shouldn't be that much strain, even with all the cables creating some measure of down force as they dangle over the edge.

My expectation is that the DAC will be able to perform slightly better due to reduced vibration across the USB port and power filter. The DAC is a USB stick (Dragonfly Cobalt) so it has a very rigid hard connection to the laptop; so vibration is very easily transferred.

Has anyone else tried this?

128x128guakus

@fuzztone 

Ok, then what is the advantage of isolating DAC noise, or amplifier noise, or any noise? Why in the name of YHWY do people who spend $60,000 USD on stereo and speakers put isolation feet on all their equipment, including the stands?

Because they can?  Because you don't?

Well, in the name of YHWY, I am going to find out regardless of the judgement. :D

 

How about vibration platforms for the chair you sit in.I mean we dont want the chair movement to interfere with the music that's playing through our audio system do we....we need to be totally isolated from the vinyl album being played on our system, Right .