Jazz for aficionados


Jazz for aficionados

I'm going to review records in my collection, and you'll be able to decide if they're worthy of your collection. These records are what I consider "must haves" for any jazz aficionado, and would be found in their collections. I wont review any record that's not on CD, nor will I review any record if the CD is markedly inferior. Fortunately, I only found 1 case where the CD was markedly inferior to the record.

Our first album is "Moanin" by Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. We have Lee Morgan , trumpet; Benney Golson, tenor sax; Bobby Timmons, piano; Jymie merrit, bass; Art Blakey, drums.

The title tune "Moanin" is by Bobby Timmons, it conveys the emotion of the title like no other tune I've ever heard, even better than any words could ever convey. This music pictures a person whose down to his last nickel, and all he can do is "moan".

"Along Came Betty" is a tune by Benny Golson, it reminds me of a Betty I once knew. She was gorgeous with a jazzy personality, and she moved smooth and easy, just like this tune. Somebody find me a time machine! Maybe you knew a Betty.

While the rest of the music is just fine, those are my favorite tunes. Why don't you share your, "must have" jazz albums with us.

Enjoy the music.
orpheus10
Frogman...Thanks for the heads up on this Dane? Gilad Hekelsman. Certainly has chops and has done the work and i have always liked Mark Turner.I looked at a few more recent videos of Gilad and he is impressive.Sounds like he is searching for the right tone on that instrument and i say stay out of the murky waters of amplification and let the instrument speak. Pat Martino....profound!

Jazzcourier, I hope they read your post in regard to saying more with fewer words, or at least "saying something". Right now, I'm suffering from eye strain trying to read their diatribes, and brain drain from trying to figure em out. I believe they are all conspiring to send me to a shrink, but now that a true "Jazz Aficionado" has come along, their efforts will be in vain. You came along at just the right time.


Enjoy the music.
Everyone feels their own passion about music and travels at their impulse in regard to what they feel is important and valuable.Jazz has always been a big puzzle and it takes lots of people to put it together,piece by piece.
   Jazz has also "suffered" from such a broad definition that it can be the greatest thing or the most boring thing,but it is still Jazz.People define the music by what they like and they covet and defend that niche irregardless of what came before or after or what is around the corner.They simply have no interest in expanding their world beyond that neighborhood.You can't deny that comfort zone.So take of it what you will,what moves you and what calls to you,but let others venture beyond your horizon.The music has a strong and undeniable power that has taken it many places.It is one helluva ride.
Nice words, JC. Among all other funny comments, there were a few posts with good music. However, still there are many forgoten ones that deserved to be heard, again. One of them is certainly guitar player Johnny Smith, who started to record since late 40’s. He played as studio musician, as well as leader on string of his albums in 60’s, but it seems that he prefered a low profile life, so that could be one of the reasons for his obscurity.
Here are the links, from his cd edition that has two albums from 1960 and 61. First is ’Sound of Jimmy Smith’, and the second is ’Johnny Smith plus the trio’.
Hope you will like it

https://youtu.be/NyiLN4jD1LY

https://youtu.be/a-JwpEhvvKE

https://youtu.be/axXFIQQSgcw
Johnny Smith! Good call.This guy was all about broad strokes of elegant harmony and he was almost alone in the preference for ballads to medium tempo tunes.What a great legacy of all those Roost and Roulette records.There were a few albums on Verve with Hank Jones.Gibson honored him with his own model archtop,it was the Rolls Royce of their line in the 50's/60's.Those early albums with Stan Getz are superb.Here is a guy who came up in the 50's and made his own path.Late in his life he made an album or two with George Van Eps while he was retired in Colorado.There is one guy left alive who plays that style-Mundell Lowe.He must be in his 90's now.He was a studio guitarist in New York in the 50's as well.

QUESTION...Anybody actually go to see either the MILES DAVIS or CHET BAKER films.....Please advise!