Jazz for aficionados


Jazz for aficionados

I'm going to review records in my collection, and you'll be able to decide if they're worthy of your collection. These records are what I consider "must haves" for any jazz aficionado, and would be found in their collections. I wont review any record that's not on CD, nor will I review any record if the CD is markedly inferior. Fortunately, I only found 1 case where the CD was markedly inferior to the record.

Our first album is "Moanin" by Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. We have Lee Morgan , trumpet; Benney Golson, tenor sax; Bobby Timmons, piano; Jymie merrit, bass; Art Blakey, drums.

The title tune "Moanin" is by Bobby Timmons, it conveys the emotion of the title like no other tune I've ever heard, even better than any words could ever convey. This music pictures a person whose down to his last nickel, and all he can do is "moan".

"Along Came Betty" is a tune by Benny Golson, it reminds me of a Betty I once knew. She was gorgeous with a jazzy personality, and she moved smooth and easy, just like this tune. Somebody find me a time machine! Maybe you knew a Betty.

While the rest of the music is just fine, those are my favorite tunes. Why don't you share your, "must have" jazz albums with us.

Enjoy the music.
orpheus10

On the subject of “influence” and Elvin Jones/Tony Williams. I think it is important when comparing players to not think too much in terms of superiority of perceived amount of “influence”.

Elvin and Williams were tremendously influential and copied by other drummers. But so were players like Philly Joe. Elvin and Williams would be the first to say it as Philly Joe was one of THEIR main influences. It’s a continuum. Jazz is always building on what came before stylistically and like any art form it reflects the time of its creation. Tommy Williams was heavily Rock influenced. He is considered by many to be the first Fusion drummer.. He was the perfect drummer for Miles’ “Second Great Quintet”. A stylistic period of Miles’ that clearly showed him headed toward a Fusion/Rock sensibility. Williams would not have been the perfect drummer for Miles’ “The Quintet”. I can’t imagine Miles’ “Cookin” without the feel and swagger that Philly Joe brought to the music.


 

Of course, that should read Tony Williams, not Tommy Williams .  Spellchecker gremlins😱

A style of saxophone playing that could be said to be “dated”, but the inventiveness and feel is on the same level as anything that came later.  Great story telling.  Just different and reflective of that time period.

 

@frogman

Well, I’m perplexed. You are more erudite than I"ll ever be on the topic of Jazz but I definitely don’t hear the music of the 2nd great 5tet as fusion-like. Once Corea and Holland arrived, yes. Before that? No.

Would you therefore characterize the albums J. McLean released when he had Williams on drums similarly, or William’s two early Blue Notes as a leader? I’m curious about your thinking process. Care to explain?

Speaking of B Carter, I particularly enjoy "Further Definitions" and "Jazz Giant" even though they sound "old fashioned" within the context of my collection, which is mostly Post Bop.