Learning to Listen: Neurological Evidence


Neurological evidence indicates we not only learn to listen, but actually tune our inner ear response based on neural feedback from the brain. We literally are able to actively tune our own hearing.  

When we listen for a flute for example, this is more than a conscious decision to focus on the flute. This creates neural impulses that actively tune ear cells to better hear the flute.  

This whole video is fascinating, but I want to get you hooked right away so check this out:  
https://youtu.be/SuSGN8yVrcU?t=1340

“Selectively changing what we’re listening to in response to the content. Literally reaching out to listen for things.


Here’s another good one. Everyone can hear subtle details about five times as good as predicted by modeling. Some of us however can hear 50 times as good. The difference? Years spent learning to listen closely! https://youtu.be/SuSGN8yVrcU?t=1956

Learning to play music really does help improve your listening.  

This video is chock full of neurphysiological evidence that by studying, learning and practice you can develop the listening skills to hear things you literally could not hear before. Our hearing evolved millennia before we invented music. We are only just now beginning to scratch at the potential evolution has bestowed on us.


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Not too long ago I saw an article in a scientific journal (misplaced as I am wont to do lately) which spoke entirely about reducing/eliminating tinnitus by training the brain to not process the errant signal it is receiving.

Good post MC, I will certainly watch it.

Regards,
barts  

Which is why I constantly warn people off of listening to their gear. You get to a point where you can hear the dust settle on your cables. What good is it for your enjoyment? You’ve become a dust detector.

Best to buy good gear and then try to retune your ear/brain to music. Take courses in music theory or music history and stop chasing down the next big tweak.

This is also why I simply cannot listen to gear in a room with poor acoustics.  I don't have that ear/brain filter many of you do.  Good for you. :)  So for my ear/brain musical needs good room acoustics are essential.
Seems that works for your interests Erik, but others enjoy differing aspects of this hobby. We are not all the same with the same audio/music desires or curiosities. Some love the music plus these other aspects of audio. All good. This site is about sharing these common passions and learning. No need to try and change other’s curiosities. 
"I am a neuroscientist"
Thankfully, you're not Mayim Bialik?

gerryah930,  When I see/hear that line, I immediately think
https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/mayim-bialiks-neuriva-commercials-make-questionable-claims/
No vote for Jeopardy host also.

"Not too long ago I saw an article in a scientific journal (misplaced as I am wont to do lately) which spoke entirely about reducing/eliminating tinnitus by training the brain to not process the errant signal it is receiving."

barts-there are many studies with this goal, but unfortunately all still far the goal. I'm patiently waiting.